Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

When you are the designated chef in a home inhabited by cookie-lovers, you need an arsenal of awesome and reliable cookie recipes. Not being a real cookie aficionado myself, I require both variety and quality if I am going to labor over cookies. There’s no way I want to be eating chocolate chip every time one of my cookie monsters comes rooting through the kitchen and begging for a fresh dozen.

A few months ago I posted our favorite sugar cookie recipe. Those are some seriously good cookies! These Coconut-Lime & White Chip cookies are great if you’re craving something a little out-of-the ordinary.

But some days just require peanut butter. Everyone needs a great peanut butter cookie recipe. (Unless you’re allergic to peanuts, obviously). And guess what, I have one for you today (yeah, I know you saw it coming…).

Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

These cookies are straight-up peanut butter, crackly on the outside and thoroughly soft and chewy on the inside. As my kiddos will inform you, mama doesn’t make crunchy cookies. You will have to look elsewhere if crunchy cookies you seek. We also love a good peanut butter and oatmeal cookie with chocolate chips, but those are for another day.

I used my favorite peanut butter, Adams Natural, for these cookies. I love Adams peanut butter because it is just that, pure peanut butter with a pinch of salt. You won’t find any added sugar or oil in there, unlike other brands of “natural” peanut butter. The Adams product is bold and still tastes sweet without the added sugar. It’s not the cheapest stuff, but I figure I’m paying for simple peanut butter instead of oil and sugar mixed in there. It works great in these cookies, but feel free to use any brand of peanut butter you like. Your results will just be a touch sweeter with most other peanut butters.

There aren’t any fancy tricks to this recipe. It’s just your typical cookie process, so if you’re craving some chewy peanut-buttery goodness and you have 15 minutes, go whip them up and tell me what you think!

Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter Cookies

Ingredients

  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup peanut butter
  • ¾ cup sugar, plus more for rolling cookies
  • ½ cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 Tablespoon milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350*.

In a mixing bowl or stand mixer, cream the butter and peanut butter until smooth. Add the sugars and beat until combined. Mix in the egg, followed by the milk and vanilla.

In a separate bowl combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients until well-combined.

Place a few tablespoons of sugar into a small bowl. Using your hands or a cookie scoop, form the dough into balls (about 1 ½ inches) and roll them in the sugar. Then place them on a baking sheet, allowing room for the cookies to spread.

Bake for 9-12 minutes, or until the cookies flatten and begin to develop cracks, but still look a bit doughy in the center. Take them out before they brown around the edges or they will start to become crispy.

Yield: 2 to 2-1/2 dozen

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/soft-chewy-peanut-butter-cookies/
Amish sugar cookies

Amish Sugar Cookies

Amish sugar cookies

I have so many fond memories of flouring, rolling, and carefully cutting (and eating) cookie dough as a kid. My siblings and I would each have a personal pile of flour to repeatedly dust our cutters, but we’d always end up prying the dough off anyway.

Then of course there was the frosting and sprinkling. And the eating. I’ll be honest, the eating is the least prominent in my memory. That is probably due to the fact that with all the flour involved, those sugar cookies were always crunchy.

Incidentally, I avoided eating sugar cookies for years. They were always at the bottom of my cookie list because they were either crunchy and tasteless, or they were the thick, crumbly kind from the store with garish frosting—and also tasteless.

I have on occasion sampled really good soft, thick sugar cookies at other people’s homes, but regrettably I don’t have a recipe for those.

Then I met Amish Sugar Cookies. Now sugar cookies are back at the top of my list. Not only are these practically impossible to stop eating, they don’t require chilling, flouring, and cutting. My poor children don’t have those flour-covered memories because when I make sugar cookies, it’s always this kind.

amish sugar cookies

I don’t know what relation the cookies have to Amish folks, so don’t ask. If they were in fact invented by the Amish, I commend them for their taste in cookies.

The texture of Amish sugar cookies is not what you’d probably expect from a sugar cookie. They’re more akin to a snicker doodle (thanks to the cream of tartar) but not as chewy. They are slightly chewy but light and melty at the same time, almost like a butter cookie. The cookie and the sour cream frosting (which is like, 10 times better than buttercream) halve a decided salty note that contributes to my uncontrollable cookie consumption.

Instead of chilling, rolling, and cutting these cookies, you’ll spoon the dough like a drop cookie and then press each ball of dough gently with a sugar-dusted glass. The dough is not sticky, so chilling is optional, however chilling does result in a thicker cookie. I usually bake one batch right away and then put the rest of the dough in the fridge for the next day.

One drawback to the sour cream icing is that it needs refrigeration, so you’ll need to refrigerate the cookies after you ice them. Or, you can store the unfrosted cookies in an airtight container but refrigerate the icing, and ice them just before eating or serving. That’s what we do—we just grab the bowl of icing out of the fridge and smear some on just before enjoying our cookies.

You can of course use food coloring to dye the icing any color you want. With Valentine’s Day this weekend, these cookies would make a special treat in pink!

Amish sugar cookies

Amish Sugar Cookies

Adapted from Our Best Bites

Ingredients

  • 1 cup room-temperature butter
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup sifted powdered sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. table salt
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar
  • ½ cup sugar
  • Sour Cream Icing:
  • ¼ cup softened butter
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 ¾ cups sifted powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • Food coloring as desired

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350*.

In a large bowl, beat butter and oil until thoroughly combined. Gradually add 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of powdered sugar, mixing well. Mix in eggs and vanilla.

In another bowl combine flour, baking soda, salt, and cream of tartar. Gradually mix flour mixture into sugar mixture, beating at low speed until combined.

If desired, chill dough 30-60 minutes. Otherwise, scoop the dough about 1 tablespoon at a time onto a cookie sheet. Take a glass and gently press one of the cookies to moisten the bottom of the glass, then dip the bottom of the glass in the ½ cup sugar. Press the glass gently onto the cookie again. Dip the glass back in the sugar and press the next cookie, and so on until each cookie has been pressed with the sugar-dusted glass.

Bake at 350* for 9-12 minutes, removing from the oven when the edges are just beginning to turn golden. Allow cookies to cool completely.

To make the icing:

Beat together the butter and sour cream, then add the powdered sugar, salt, vanilla and food coloring and beat until smooth. Ice the cooled cookies as desired.

Refrigerate iced cookies until ready to serve, or store un-frosted cookies in an airtight container and refrigerate the icing, then ice cookies prior to serving.

Makes about 4 dozen cookies.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/amish-sugar-cookies/
Peanut Butter Playdough

Peanut Butter Playdough

While a college student with a toddler son, Peanut Butter Playdough1it occurred to me one day that it had been way too long since I had eaten peanut butter playdough. And that it might be fun for him to play with. But mostly that I really wanted to eat some. I could remember that taste and texture so vividly–soft, chewy peanut-butter-and honey goodness. This playdough is fun and you can stir it together in seconds. It tastes way, way better than regular playdough, obviously, and has the perfect texture for molding into imaginative shapes.

This isn’t an original recipe by any means, but it’s definitely one to have in your arsenal of fun activities and treats for kids, as long as your kids don’t have peanut allergies of course. You can enhance the fun and tastiness by serving things like chocolate chips, raisins, marshmallows, pretzels, M&Ms, etc. alongside the playdough to aid in construction.

It only takes three ingredients: honey, powdered milk*, and peanut butter.

Peanut Butter Playdough Ingredients

Measure them into a bowl and stir them together until they form a cohesive, moldable dough. It looks funny at first.

Peanut Butter Playdough Ingredients

Have faith and be persistent, people. Keep stirring until it looks something like this.

Peanut Butter Playdough Mixed

The texture of your playdough will vary depending on what brands of products you use and the climate you live in, so here are some adjustments you can make until you have the texture you want. Brace yourself, this is complicated.

If your playdough is too dry and crumbly, mix in a little more honey.
If your playdough is too sticky, mix in a little more powdered milk.

There you go, peanut butter playdough ready for the taking. It will become smooth and shiny as it is played with. Do try not to eat it all before your kids touch it.

*As far as the powdered milk is concerned, make sure to use nonfat dry milk, and not instant milk granules. Dry milk is a fine powder that will give you a smooth-textured dough. Instant milk is made of little round-ish granules that will make your playdough rough and crunchy. So unless you enjoy crunchy playdough, stick with the dry powdered milk.

Please remember not to feed recipes containing honey to children under 1 year of age.

Peanut Butter Playdough

Peanut Butter Playdough

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter

Instructions

Measure ingredients into a bowl and stir until thoroughly combined. If the dough is too dry and crumbly, mix in a little more honey. If it is too sticky, mix in a little more dry milk. It will become smooth and shiny as it is played with.

Not safe for children under 1 year of age because it contains honey.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/peanut-butter-playdough/

Linked at: Living Well Spending Less

Best Ever Rice Krispie Treats

Best Ever Rice Krispie Treats

When I was in high school, Best Ever Rice Krispie Treats I had some super-cool young women’s group leaders from church who would come to my high school campus and eat lunch with the girls from my neighborhood once a month. More specifically, they brought us lunch, a welcome change from the cafeteria menu. We sat on the lawn or in in the seminary building and enjoyed pizza, veggies, and these rice krispie treats.

Now, I would have to be pretty darn hungry to be tempted by one of those squares in the blue shiny wrapper. I’m not really big on the recipe from the back of the Rice Krispie box either. But these were not your normal rice krispie treats, and our group of about 10 girls had no trouble devouring a couple pans of these.

I always wished I had the recipe for those magical gooey squares, but I never got around to asking. Then when I was engaged (admittedly, I was engaged to be married within a year after graduating high school) the ladies from church threw me a “recipe” shower, where they brought their favorite recipes to give me, along with non-perishable ingredients and kitchenware. To my delight, this rice krispie recipe was among the gifts!

Even though these are super quick and easy to make, I don’t make them very often because they are just so hard to stop eating. And they are, um, not exactly healthy.

The secrets that make these squares better than the usual ones is that you combine a ton of butter with brown and white sugar, and boil them till they begin to caramelize. This, along with the vanilla, lends a flavor dimension and irresistibility that isn’t there with regular rice krispies. The final touch is that you reserve part of the bag of marshmallows until the very end. You stir them in after the rice krispies, so that they don’t melt all the way. This helps keep the texture soft and chewy. One of the worst things about the standard rice krispie treat is that it’s like an edible sandstone brick that tries to divest you of your gums when you bite into it. These “best ever” treats are much more forgiving to the mouth.

Make these next time you need a quick treat–just make sure you aren’t the only one around, or you might end up eating the whole pan before you know it!

Best Ever Rice Krispie Treats

Best Ever Rice Krispie Treats

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 8 cups crispy rice cereal
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 bag small marshmallows, divided

Instructions

Set aside 1 1/2 cups of the marshmallows.

Melt butter in a large pot over medium heat. Stir in the sugars and bring to a boil. Boil for exactly 2 minutes and 20 seconds, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and add in the vanilla and marshmallows, stirring until the marshmallows are melted. Immediately add the rice cereal and stir gently until the cereal is coated. Gently fold in the reserved marshmallows.

Press into a 9 x 13 pan and allow to cool before cutting.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/best-ever-rice-krispie-treats/

Linked at: Living Well Spending Less

Cranberry-Orange Buttermilk Scones with White Chocolate

Cranberry-Orange Scones with White Chocolate

In my last post I shared the yummy Cranberry-Orange Buttermilk Scones with White Chocolateegg-free cookie recipe that saved my bacon when I promised a certain toddler we’d make cookies, and almost failed him when I opened the fridge to find no eggs.

This recipe came to my rescue when I needed a breakfast and had no eggs.

Yes, I know there are easy, healthier breakfasts that don’t require eggs, like yogurt, oatmeal, granola, smoothies…but we have those things A LOT. And since I prefer only to hit the grocery stores twice each month, sometimes we go a few days without eggs if I didn’t plan well. I am not really satisfied eating yogurt and oatmeal for days on end, even if the kiddos are.

So, I made these awesome scones for breakfast. Now, I realize that many of you out there would never eat a buttery-pastry-ish-thing topped with white chocolate for breakfast. I’ve been known to voice my frustrations with the close resemblance between many breakfast options and dessert.

However.

I made these for breakfast. And they were so delectable, I ate them all day long. If you consider the fact that my family consumes an average of 1 ½ sticks of butter per week, and this recipe alone uses an entire 1 ½ sticks of butter…well. I’ll probably have to relegate these melt-in-your mouth little triangles to the dessert category. Because eating them at the end of the day is far more justifiable than eating them at the beginning of the day, yes?

Lest anyone from Utah be confused, these are not the deep-fried scones you grew up eating with butter and honey. They are tender, flaky triangles of baked butter dough that can sponsor any number of flavor variations, and they are worth a try even if you are a die-hard fan of the fried batter by the same name.

I love the combination of bright orange zest and fresh cranberries, topped with a drizzle of sweet white chocolate. The tartness of the cranberries contrasts the sweetness of the scone and white chocolate. Believe me when I say that fresh cranberries are much better chopped and baked in a sugary scone than eaten plain and whole. My son disagrees. He thinks they are great raw. I made a grave error in thinking that giving him one would give his little mouth such a sour shock he wouldn’t ask for more. Do you know anyone else who eats raw cranberries for fun? Not me.

If white chocolate isn’t your thing, these would also be great with a simple glaze made from powdered sugar and orange juice, or dark chocolate, or whatever suits your fancy. You can see in the pictures that I smeared the chocolate on instead of drizzling it because I was in a hurry to get somewhere. But you can make yours as pretty as you want, okay?

So tell me, would you eat these for breakfast or dessert? Or both?

Cranberry-Orange Buttermilk Scones with White Chocolate

Cranberry-Orange Scones with White Chocolate

Ingredients

  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • zest of 1 orange
  • 3/4 cup butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cranberries
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup white baking chips

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400*.

Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and orange zest in a mixing bowl and mix well. Using a pastry cutter, fork, or your hands, cut the butter into the dry ingredients until crumbly. Mix in the cranberries.

Make a crater in the middle of the dough and add the buttermilk all at once. Stir the buttermilk into the flour mixture until barely combined.

Gently form the dough into a ball and knead it 12 times, turning the bowl 1/4 turn each time. Be gentler than you would be when kneading bread dough.

Transfer the dough ball to a cutting board, divide into two balls, and lightly press each ball into a circle. Cut each circle into 8 triangles and place on a greased cookie sheet. Bake for 10-15 minutes, until edges are just starting to turn golden. Transfer to a cooling rack and let them cool.

When scones have cooled, place the chocolate chips in a dry microwaveable container, and heat uncovered in 30 second intervals until melted, stirring between each interval. Drizzle melted chocolate over the scones.

Makes 16 scones.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/cranberry-orange-scones-with-white-chocolate/
eggless chocolate chip cookies

Eggless Chocolate Chip Cookies

A few weeks ago I experienced a egg free chocolate chip cookies sensation of impending doom. I promised my almost-3-year-old son that if he helped clean up his toys, he could help me make cookies. He energetically completed the task at hand, and beamed up at me when I announced the anticipated time had arrived. Then I opened the fridge and…there were no eggs to be seen! This is when my heart dropped into my stomach as my boy bounced up and down, watching what I was doing. What now?

First I considered shortbread, but was deterred by the colossal quantity of butter it would consume. Besides, I didn’t want a crunchy cookie. Then it occurred to me that there are a lot of people in the world with egg allergies or vegan preferences, so I hastily scoured Pinterest for a promising-looking cookie recipe that didn’t involve eggs. Finally I settled on this recipe, which has a “secret ingredient” that happens to be one of my favorite things—cream cheese.

Even still, I wasn’t too hopeful for the outcome. Can you have a really good, chewy chocolate cookie without eggs? At the least, though, it would redeem my promise to a certain toddler, who would undoubtedly appreciate the results purely on the basis of sugar and “chwocate.”

One of the great things about this recipe is that since the dough does not contain eggs, you can eat it without fear of salmonella poisoning. Not that I can claim adherence to that particular food safety rule anyway…I was raised on cookie dough and brownie batter. Here are my kitchen helpers indulging in the rewards of their labors.

cookiehelpers1 eating cookie dough

You can see from looking at the dough that there is a little different appearance to the texture.

no egg chocolate chip cookie dough

When the cookies came out of the oven, I was pleasantly surprised. These cookies are chewy and barely distinguishable from the usual chocolate chip cookie. While I can’t claim to be a cookie connoisseur, my husband is an insatiable cookie lover. He ate half a dozen of these when he got home from work, and declared them amazing cookies—all without knowing they were unconventional, egg-free cookies! So, with that seal of approval, I have added this cookie recipe to my collection of reliable, approved cookies.

Enjoy!

Has anyone else ever been in a no-eggs-in-the fridge crisis? What did you do?

eggless chocolate chip cookies

Eggless Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients

  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 8 oz. cream cheese, softened
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 cup chocolate chips

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350*.

Cream butter, cream cheese, sugars, and vanilla until smooth. Add the salt, baking soda, and flour and mix until thoroughly combined. Mix in the chocolate chips.

Drop by rounded spoonful onto a cookie sheet. Bake for 8-10 minutes. Let rest 2-3 minutes, then transfer to a cooling rack.

Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/eggless-chocolate-chip-cookies/

 


Linked at: The Weekend Re-Treat

baked-buttermilk-pumpkin-donuts-brown-butter-glaze

Baked Buttermilk Pumpkin Donuts with Brown Butter Glaze

You don’t think that baked donuts can be as good as deep fried donuts? baked-buttermilk-pumpkin-donuts-brown-butter-glaze Neither did I, until I tried this recipe from The Cafe Sucre Farine. I had always thought of baked donuts as being muffins in a donut shape. Imposters. Kind of like how those fresh tomatoes at the store look like tomatoes but don’t taste like them.

Well, this recipe for baked buttermilk pumpkin donuts has permanently changed my perspective. They are as delicious as a fried cake donut, but they don’t require the tedious process of sticky dough-rings free-falling into hot, smelly oil.

In case you can’t tell, the donuts pictured are actually mini-donuts. I didn’t exactly mean to make donuts this tiny…let me explain.

I ordered a mini donut pan on Amazon, but I didn’t realize just how miniscule they would actually be. For some reason I had the mistaken thought that a mini-donut pan would be the same dimensions as a standard donut pan, but with twice as many molds, thus yielding donuts about 1/3 the size of a regular donut. (Okay, so I’m not sure if the dimensional math would work out that way. I’m severely challenged in the visual-spatial-mathematical department.) And of course, I didn’t check to see if there was a description of the pan’s actual dimensions online.

I was rather surprised to find a manila envelope in my mailbox…I didn’t think a baking pan could fit in a mailbox. Upon opening said envelope, I saw what looked like a child’s play-kitchen version of a donut pan.

I proceeded to make these lovely little donuts for a family Halloween party. And I was taking that pan in and out of the oven, wiping it clean, and refilling it all morning long. And into the afternoon. After countless batches, I finally managed to use up half of the batter (I had doubled the recipe, haha.) At that point, I poured the rest of the batter into a muffin tin.

Do you want to know how big these donuts actually were? Roughly the size of my husband’s wedding band. The upside is, they were great for a party because people could taste them and still have room for other things. But seriously, next time I’ll buy a regular donut pan!

Don’t skip the glaze on these donuts! The brown butter glaze is irresistible. At the end of the day, I found my toddler meticulously scraping the glaze off of the cookie sheet that I had once held the buttermilk pumpkin donuts. (No wonder he didn’t answer when I asked what he was doing from the other room!) The original recipe includes directions for a maple glaze, so if maple appeals to you, try it and let me know what you think. I wanted something with a milder flavor because I really wanted the pumpkin flavor to shine.

An important note: Don’t substitute light brown sugar for the dark brown sugar. I’ve tried this, and while they still taste good, the donuts have a more “muffin-y” texture than a cake donut texture. Also, although many people recommend subbing milk and vinegar/lemon juice for buttermilk in recipes, my opinion is that the flavor is superior with real cultured buttermilk. I culture my own buttermilk using buttermilk from the store so that I always have a jar of buttermilk in the fridge. Here’s a tutorial from Alaska from Scratch on how to make your own cultured buttermilk. It’s super easy and less expensive than buying buttermilk from the store every time you need it.

baked-buttermilk-pumpkin-donuts-brown-butter-glaze

Baked Buttermilk Pumpkin Donuts with Brown Butter Glaze

Ingredients

    Baked Buttermilk Pumpkin Donuts:
  • adapted from The Cafe Sucre Farine
  • ¼ cup butter, melted
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 yolk, from a large egg
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • Brown Butter Glaze:
  • 1/2 c. salted butter
  • 1 TBS vanilla
  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • Evaporated milk to desired consistency

Instructions

Buttermilk Pumpkin Donuts:

Preheat the oven to 350* and spray two (standard) donut pans well with cooking spray.

Mix butter, oil, buttermilk, egg, egg yolk, brown sugar, pumpkin, and vanilla in a large bowl until smooth. In a separate bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet mixture and stir just until the dry ingredients are incorporated; don’t over-mix.

Pour the batter into a large zip-top bag. Seal the bag and cut an opening in one of the bottom corners about 1/4” wide. Gently squeeze the bag to pipe the batter into the donut wells, dividing evenly among the 12 molds.

Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until the tops spring back when lightly touched and a toothpick inserted in a donut comes out clean. Let the donuts cool for 5 minutes, then carefully turn them out onto a cooling rack. Don’t skip the 5 minutes of resting or your donuts will fall apart. When your glaze is ready, carefully dip the donuts by gently pressing them, round side down (the side that was on the bottom, in the donut pan) into the glaze, then sitting them glaze-side-up on a rack. Alternately, you could drizzle the donuts with the glaze. Whatever suits your fancy.

Brown Butter Glaze:

Measure powdered sugar and vanilla in a mixing bowl.

Place butter in a small saucepan. Stir and cook over medium heat. The butter will develop a thick foam and begin to turn brown. When it becomes a caramel color, pour it immediately into the powdered sugar, or it will start to burn in the hot pan. You can find a detailed tutorial for browning butter at Our Best Bites.

Add evaporated milk a little at a time and beat until you reach your desired glaze consistency.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/baked-buttermilk-pumpkin-donuts-with-brown-butter-glaze/

Linked at: Miz Helen’s Country Cottage

coconut-lime-white-chip-cookies-whole-wheat

Coconut-Lime White Chip Cookies with Whole Wheat

I live in a home with two cookie lovers. coconut-lime-white-chip-whole-wheat-cookies1 I am not one of them. Nevertheless, I make them because I enjoy the enthused reaction when my son and my husband realize I am making cookies. It makes me instantly popular.

These cookies do have a certain appeal even to me, though. Coconut is one of my “magic” ingredients right now. I try to find ways to put coconut  in anything I can–drinks, cookies, curries, dinner, dessert– just because I’m entranced with coconut flavor.

I adapted this recipe from Our Best Bites. I highly recommend both of their cookbooks, especially their salad dressings. I made some pretty significant changes to suit these cookies to our tastes, though. I like my cookies to be less buttery than many people like them. Overly buttery cookies (the kind that leave grease spots on anything they touch) tend to make me feel a bit queasy. So, I often decrease the amount of fat in cookies. Now, this isn’t because I’m trying to make them healthy. My personal philosophy is to make meals as healthy as I can, and then enjoy dessert in its fully caloric splendor. Dessert is usually fatty and sugary by definition, so if you take away the fat and sugar, it isn’t dessert anymore. Like low-fat ice cream.

Anyway, another change I like to make is to exchange some whole-wheat flour in place of all-purpose flour. I really like the rich taste of whole wheat, and it adds fiber.  Plus, if you use white whole wheat, there won’t be a large color difference in your goodies.

The final touch to these cookies is to omit the salt from the dough and instead, sprinkle it on the outside of the cookies just before baking. It makes them taste amazing. It heightens the never-fail sweet and salty combo that makes you want to eat more and more of a treat.

coconut-lime-whole-wheat-cookies

If you want your cookies to really be irresistible, use Guittard Choc Au Lait Vanilla Milk Chips. (Hint: I find them cheaper in stores than online.) I can hardly keep these in the house because everyone wants to snack on them plain. They aren’t your corn-syrup-and-plastic-dyed-white kind of chips. They are dreamy drops of real vanilla, cocoa butter, and milk. (In case you were wondering, this is not a sponsored post.)

Enjoy some salty, sweet, and chewy coconut-lime white chip cookies! They mix together in about 15 minutes and only take 8 minutes to bake.

coconut-lime-white-chip-cookies-whole-wheat

Coconut-Lime White Chip Cookies with Whole Wheat

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, spooned lightly into measuring cup and leveled with a knife
  • 1 cup white whole wheat flour, spooned lightly and leveled
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 cup (one stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 cup shredded coconut (toasted or untoasted)
  • 1 cup white chocolate chips
  • zest of one large lime
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher or sea salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 325*. Spray a cookie sheet lightly with cooking spray or line with parchment paper.

Combine flours and baking soda in a small bowl. In a large bowl, combine butter and sugars and mix well. Mix in the egg, egg yolk, and vanilla. Add dry ingredients to wet and mix until combined. Stir in the coconut, white chocolate chips, and lime zest.

Form cookie dough into small balls (about 1 1/2 tablespoons each) and place on cookie sheet about 2 inches apart. Give each cookie a light sprinkle of salt. Bake 8-9 minutes. The edges should be set but the centers will still appear soft and will set as the cookies cool. Let cool for a few minutes, then place on a cooling rack. Makes about 2 1/2 dozen cookies.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/coconut-lime-white-chip-cookies-with-whole-wheat/


raspberry-pretzel-dessert-crepes

Raspberry Pretzel Dessert Crepes

Has anyone else been loving all raspberry-pretzel-dessert-crepes the sales on berries this summer? The idea for this recipe began forming in my mind shortly before Father’s Day, because when I think of making a treat for my dad, raspberries top the charts. For as long as I can remember, we have celebrated my dad’s birthday with raspberries, whipped cream, and angel food cake. Chocolate is for Mom, berries for Dad…

Since my toddler is willing and able to consume an entire carton of berries in one sitting, be they raspberry, blueberry, or strawberry-kind, I had no doubt that this treat would be appreciated. And it was.

If you’ve had raspberry jello pretzel dessert, this is the crepe version. I like raspberry pretzel salad a lot, but I can take or leave the jello part. The other problem is that by the that time raspberry pretzel dessert makes it to leftover status (if that happens, that is) the pretzel crust is prone to becoming soggy. Some people like things better when they become soggy, like my husband, who pours his cereal and then waits for it to become milk-logged before consuming it. Nothing wrong with that of course, but I prefer certain crunchy items (like cereal and pretzel crusts) to retain their crunchy state. This version of the treat bypasses the presence of the jello and the potentially soggy crust and instead rolls tangy raspberry sauce, sweet creamy filling, and buttery candied pretzels into a golden crepe. I made this for a dessert, but I may have eaten the leftovers for breakfast…

raspberry-pretzel-dessert-crepes

Raspberry Pretzel Dessert Crepes

Raspberry Pretzel Dessert Crepes

Ingredients

    Raspberry Filling:
  • ¼ c. cold water
  • 2 TBS cornstarch
  • ¼ c. sugar
  • 1 c. raspberries (fresh or frozen)
  • Creamy filling:
  • ¼ c. sugar
  • 4 oz. cream cheese, softened
  • ½ c. whipping cream
  • Candied Pretzels:
  • 2 TBS butter
  • 2 TBS sugar
  • 1 c. coarsely crushed pretzels
  • Crepes:
  • 1 ½ c. milk
  • 1 c. flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 TBS sugar
  • 1 TBS canola oil
  • 1/8 tsp. salt

Instructions

Raspberry filling:

Combine cold water and cornstarch in a microwave-safe container. Add sugar and raspberries and stir to combine. Microwave on high at one minute intervals, stirring after each minute, until the mixture becomes clear and begins to thicken. In a high-powered microwave this should take about 3-4 minutes. Set aside to cool while you make the other toppings.

Creamy Filling:

Whip sugar and cream cheese together until smooth. In a separate bowl, whip cream until stiff peaks begin to form. Add cream to cream cheese mixture and whip until smooth.

Candied Pretzels:

Melt butter and sugar in a small skillet over medium heat until they melt together and bubble. Add the crushed pretzels and cook, stirring frequently for 5 minutes or until they just begin to brown and smell toasty. Quickly transfer to a plate to cool.

Crepes:

Place all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth. Heat a lightly greased 6” skillet or crepe maker to medium-high. When hot, lift the skillet and pour in just enough batter to coat the bottom of the pan as you swirl it. Return to heat and cook until the edges are turning golden brown. Remove to a plate. Fill each crepe with a spoonful each of cream filling, raspberry filling, and candied pretzels. Makes about 14 crepes.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/raspberry-pretzel-dessert-crepes/