Honey Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Corn Tacos

Honey-Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean, and Corn Tacos

Honey Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Corn Tacos

Orange-tinted meat, diced tomato, and a few lettuce bit were my singular conception of the taco from age one to something-teen. Anyone else? Oh, I forgot something. The crunchy shell. The tooth-cracking yellow case—well, let’s not talk about that anymore.

I am so glad that at some point real tacos were introduced into my taco-impaired schema. You know, the kind with slow-simmered shredded meat, slathered in cheese, guacamole, and pico de gallo or garden salsa? And wrapped in a lovely, soft, flour tortilla? THAT kind of taco. (PS, if your idea of the idea of the exalted taco is still ground beef hidden in a yellow crunch-crunch, you might want to leave before I reveal this recipe. It’s probably not for you.)

Nothing will ever supplant a legit shredded-meat-cheese-and-salsa taco. But, the tacos I am about to share with you are a really fantastic way to change up your Taco Tuesdays. The flavors make for a fabulous fresh meal that will have you wondering why you never thought to put sweet potatoes in a tortilla before. (PPS—if your idea of sweet potatoes is still those squishy canned yams smothered in marshmallow soup, the idea of sweet potatoes in a taco is probably abhorrent. We need to fundamentally change your ideas about how sweet potatoes can look, smell, and taste. No mush, no marshmallows. Amen)

Honey Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Corn Tacos

In this recipe, you’re going to peel and dice your sweet potato, coat it with some oil and spices, and place it on a tray in the oven to roast. Meanwhile, you’ll sauté a chopped onion to caramel-y perfection, add in the garlic, beans, and corn, and toss them in honey and lime juice. Then pull the sweet potatoes out of the oven and toss them into the skillet along with a little chopped cilantro. Serve with your favorite toppings (I’m thinking avocados plus some cotija/queso fresco or crema), and you’re done.  Once you’ve made this a couple times, it will become one of the fastest fresh meals you can make. It takes me only 20 minutes to get it on the table, largely because the recipe is easy to memorize and hard to mess up!

I never guessed the textures and flavors of honey, lime, sweet potatoes, black beans, corn, and caramelized onions could make such a delicious taco. Tell me what you think!

Honey Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean and Corn Tacos

Honey-Lime Sweet Potato, Black Bean, and Corn Tacos

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/2 –inch pieces
  • 4 TBS oil, divided
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • ¼ tsp ground coriander
  • 1/8-1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • ½ tsp salt (more to taste)
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 cup corn, drained (about ½ can)
  • 3 Tablespoons honey
  • 3 Tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (or more to taste)
  • Flour tortillas
  • Optional toppings: Diced avocados, cheese (such as cotija, queso fresco, feta, Monterey, pepperjack), fresh salsa or pico de gallo

Instructions

Preheat oven to 425* F. Line a baking sheet with foil.

Place sweet potatoes on foil-lined sheet. Drizzle 3 TBS of the oil over the sweet potatoes and toss them with your hands until coated. Sprinkle the paprika, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and salt and pepper and toss with your hands again until coated evenly. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until tender.

Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 TBSP of oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until they turn golden-brown and taste sweet. Add the garlic and cook for about 30 seconds more. Reduce heat and add in the black beans, corn, honey, and lime juice. When everything is heated through, remove from the heat and stir in the sweet potatoes and cilantro. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Serve in warm tortillas with your favorite toppings.

Recipe adapted from Cooking Classy

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/honey-lime-sweet-potato-black-bean-and-corn-tacos/

 

Chipotle Southwestern Salad

Chipotle Southwestern Salad

Chipotle Southwestern Salad

I absolutely love a salad that is a full meal, independent of anything else. Salads offer so much variety of color, flavor, and texture all in one place. A full-meal salad is a fundamentally different experience than those namby-pamby cafeteria salads with their bits of iceberg lettuce and carrot shreds that you have to drench with a quart of ranch to make worthy of consumption.

This salad is of course one of the former. It stars this chipotle-lime chicken and this creamy avocado-lime dressing, and it’s hearty and flavorful enough that you can omit the chicken if you want a fresh meatless meal. The array of flavors here work perfectly together. The chipotle-lime chicken and roasted sweet potatoes are somewhat spicy on their own, but combined in the salad with the creamy dressing, they create a great mild-medium heat. Sweet corn, smoky black beans, and green onions round everything out over a bed of crisp lettuce.

Chipotle Southwestern Salad

I wouldn’t have guessed my 3-year-old would be into salads, but surprise, he not only wanted thirds, but chose it as his snack the next day. The chipotle roasted sweet potatoes were definitely the favorite item!

Another great feature of this salad is that the ingredients can all be prepared in advance. You can cook a couple pounds of chicken ahead of time and use half for one meal (or freeze it) and save the other half for this salad later on. You can also roast the sweet potatoes and whip up the dressing ahead of time. Then all you have to do is open a can of beans and a can of corn and you’re ready to go.

It seems like everyone on the web is working on some diet or another. I’m not, but I do look for nutritious meals that don’t sacrifice taste. This is one of them! High in lean protein and veggies, this chipotle southwestern salad is a winner on our table–speaking of which, I’m (very) happy to report that our family now has a dinner table! As in, an actual hardwood-not-cardboard dinner table. Complete with chairs. Woot!

Chipotle Southwestern Salad with Creamy Avocado-Lime Dressing

Chipotle Southwestern Salad

Inspired by Pinch of Yum

Ingredients

  • 1 head romaine lettuce
  • 1 lb sweet potatoes
  • 2 TBS oil
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp coriander
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp chipotle chili powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can corn, drained
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/2 recipe chipotle-lime chicken
  • 1 recipe avocado-lime dressing , cut into bite-sized pieces
  • cotija or queso fresco cheese, optional

Instructions

Preheat oven to 425* and line a baking sheet with foil.

Peel and chop sweet potatoes into bite-sized pieces and place on the foil-lined baking sheet. Toss with 2 TBS oil and spices, using your hands to ensure they are evenly coated. Spread into a single layer on the pan and roast at 425* for 15 minutes. Flip/stir the sweet potatoes on the pan and roast for an additional 10-15 minutes or until they are beginning to brown. Set aside to cool.

Arrange lettuce on salad plates and top with sweet potatoes, beans, corn, chicken, green onions and cheese if desired. Serve with avocado-lime dressing.

Serves 4-6.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/chipotle-southwestern-salad/
Pork Cutlet Donburi Katsudon Japanese Rice Bowl

Pork Cutlet Donburi (Katsudon)

I lived in Japan from age 1 to 2. Pork Cutlet Donburi Katsudon Japanese Rice Bowl Sadly, we left before I became fluent in English, much less Japanese. And I remember almost nothing about Japan. Fortunately, my parents do, and my mom continued to cook delicious Japanese-inspired dishes throughout my childhood. For me, Japanese cuisine is the pinnacle of comfort food.

Of course, buying lots of authentic ingredients for Japanese cooking here in the United States can get expensive and inconvenient. This is especially true where I live right now. I haven’t been able to locate an Asian market within 50 miles of here. That’s one reason I love my mom’s adaptations of Japanese cooking. They’re economical and the ingredients are easy to find in the grocery store, yet the results still taste delicious and special.

This particular recipe for pork cutlet donburi (katsu-don), or Japanese pork and rice bowl, feels like a fancy restaurant meal, even though all of the ingredients are very inexpensive. It does require deep-frying, which is not my favorite activity, but it’s worth it for this dish. Cheap, lean pork chops never taste so good as when they’re pounded thin and tender, battered in crispy corn flakes or panko, and deep-fried to golden-crisp perfection.

The original, authentic version of this recipe calls for dashi broth and mirin. I don’t like to keep alcoholic beverages in my home, even for cooking (because I like to taste everything I cook with), but my mom’s version of the sweet and savory broth calls only for common ingredients, in just the right proportions to be flavorful and delicious!

Pork Cutlet Donburi Katsudon Japanese Rice Bowl

This pork cutlet donburi is also adaptable to individual tastes in the family. Those who don’t like certain ingredients, whether it be the onion, the peas, or the egg, can have their portions prepared without. Or, the pork cutlets can be dipped in a favorite sauce, tonkatsu style, with rice on the side.

Next time you have some lean pork chops or a pork loin or sirloin roast in your freezer, try dressing them up for a restaurant-style Japanese dish, customized for the budget-conscious American family.

Pork Cutlet Donburi Katsudon Japanese Rice Bowl

Pork Cutlet Donburi (Katsudon)

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups short-grain rice, cooked
  • vegetable oil for deep-frying
  • 4 small, lean boneless pork chops or loin filets
  • salt and pepper
  • Coating:
  • 3 TBS flour
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 cup crushed cornflakes or panko
  • Broth:
  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp beef boulion
  • 1 medium onion, sliced thinly
  • 3-4 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup frozen green peas

Instructions

Heat vegetable oil 1-inch deep in a large pan or wok to 340* F or until a few cornflake crumbs dropped into the middle of the oil surface immediately. Trim any excess fat from the pork filets and pound them to 1/4” thick. Sprinkle both sides with salt and pepper. Dredge each filet first in flour, then the egg, letting the excess egg drip off. Then coat with the crushed cornflakes or panko, pressing them gently into the pork chop. Fry pork chops in the oil for 4 to 5 minutes on each side, or until golden-brown. Drain on paper towels, then cut each cutlet into thin slices.

Mix the broth ingredients in a bowl. Pour a quarter of this broth into a seperate skillet or saucepan and bring to a boil. Add a portion of the onion and cook over medium heat for 2 minutes, or until tender. Add the slices of one cutlet and cook 1 minute more. When the broth has thoroughly coated the cutlet, push the onion and cutlet slices to one side of the pan. Pour one portion of the eggs into the other half of the pan, giving it a few gentle stirs as it cooks. Add ¼ cup of the peas to the pan and cook about 1 minute more.

Place one portion of the steamed rice in a bowl, and dress it with the cutlet, egg, onion and pea mixture. Repeat this process for the remaining portions.

Serves 4 as a main dish.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/pork-cutlet-donburi-katsudon-japanese-rice-bowl/
Blackened Chicken Alfredo

Blackened Chicken Alfredo

Isn’t it nice when you experience Blackened Chicken Alfredo that rare occasion when everyone in your family eats the meal you prepared, with no complaints? I know my kids aren’t nearly as difficult about eating as some, but I still have to endure a few requests for other foods (ice cream, peanut butter, fruit snacks, cookies…why do they think I’ll give them these for dinner?) before they’ll relent and try what I’ve served them. The youngest, in particular, will loudly lobby for anything other than what is on her tray, regardless of what it is.

I am therefore happy to report that this recipe has been well-received by everyone on multiple occasions. The chicken is juicy and flavorful, and the noodles are creamy and cheesy. We love this versatile alfredo sauce recipe, which is lightened up from the traditional cream sauce but still tastes rich and delicious. It’s from the great cooks over at Our Best Bites, and we use it all the time.

I used to use a brand of whole grain pasta that was made with about 50% whole wheat. However, I found a great sale on Ronzoni pasta, which is 100% wheat, with no other ingredients. Not having tried it before, I took a risk and stocked up on it because the price was too good to pass up. Thankfully, it turned out to be great pasta. One important note about whole wheat pasta though—I always cook it way longer than the box says, sometimes twice as long. This is partially because I live at a high altitude, and partially because I like soft pasta. This is what it takes for me to reach a soft, smooth pasta with whole wheat though, so if you haven’t liked whole wheat pasta in the past, you might try cooking it longer and see what happens. Or just use white pasta, or gluten-free, or grass pasta, or bird pasta…or whatever. One thing I love about whole wheat pasta is that it doesn’t get all mushy-starchy like white pasta; it retains its texture very well.

The blackening rub for the chicken is from Amber at Dessert Now, Dinner Later, and it’s easy and delicious. It has only a slight bit of heat, but you could reduce or omit the cayenne pepper if you wish. I broil the chicken because it isn’t convenient for me to grill right now (did I mention the wind and the freshly plowed fields? I ate some really gritty hot dogs the other day…). But they would definitely be great grilled, too.

The best part about this meal is it looks and tastes like fine dining, but it’s actually really easy. You might serve it with a tossed green salad and crusty bread, and perhaps some fresh fruit.

Blackened Chicken Alfredo

Blackened Chicken Alfredo

Ingredients

  • 1 12-13.5 oz box whole wheat pasta
  • 1 1/2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts, pounded or sliced to 1/2 inch thickness
  • 1 TBS + 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp dried ginger
  • 1/4 tsp dried sage
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 tsp paprika
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 TBS canola oil
  • Light Alfredo Sauce
  • 1 TBS butter
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 TBS flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 cups low-fat milk
  • 1/3 cup (3 oz) low-fat cream cheese
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly shredded
  • Ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

Cook pasta according to package directions.

Meanwhile, preheat your broiler with the top rack a few inches from the heating element, and line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Combine the chili powder, ginger, sage, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, paprika, black pepper, salt, and oil in a small bowl. Use your hands to massage the spice mixture into the chicken breasts until they are thoroughly coated.

Place the chicken breasts in a single layer on the foil-lined sheet so that they aren't touching each other. Broil 7-12 minutes on each side until the internal temperature is 165*. Remember to leave the oven door open slightly while broiling. (Alternately, you could grill the chicken.) Remove from the oven and let stand for 10 minutes before slicing.

Alfredo Sauce:

Combine flour, salt, milk, and cream cheese in a blender and process until smooth. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. When butter is melted, saute garlic for about 30 seconds or until fragrant, stirring contstantly. Add the milk mixture to the pan. Cook and stir over medium heat for several minutes, stirring constantly. It will come to a simmer and then begin to thicken. When sauce is thickened, remove from the heat and stir in the cheese until melted. Season with a few cracks of black pepper if desired. Immediately cover the pan and let it sit for 10 minutes before using. It will continue to thicken as it cools.

When pasta and chicken are ready, arrange chicken over pasta and drizzle with alfredo sauce.

Serves 4-6.

Notes

Leftover alfredo sauce can be refrigerated or frozen. It becomes very thick when cold, so when you want to use it, heat it and add milk until you reach the consistency you want.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/blackened-chicken-alfredo/

Linked at: Living Well Spending Less

Chipotle Lime Chicken

Chipotle-Lime Chicken

Chipotle Lime Chicken

I love the flavor combo of chipotle and lime.  What I don’t always love is that most chipotle-lime dishes seem to be swimming in sugar or honey—which is why I created this recipe to feature lots of bold chipotle and fresh lime flavor, without the overt sweetness!

Boneless skinless chicken breasts are definitely the most often-used meat in my house. They’re lean and versatile, and well under $2/lb when they’re on sale. On the other hand, they’re pretty flavorless on their own compared with other meats, so you need an arsenal of recipes to jazz them up.

My favorite method of cooking chicken breasts is the grill, no questions asked. When it’s 15 degrees outside and windy, though, there’s no way I’m going out to the carport to fire up our little portable grill. Actually, I did do that once this winter. Then I sat the little canister of propane on the steps outside until my husband got home because I was afraid the temperature change from outdoors to indoors might cause the canister to explode. Yeah, I’m weird that way. I have an irrational fear of explosive materials. Good thing our house heat is fueled by a 250-gallon propane tank in the backyard! Once when I was 10 I tried to make spaghetti, but I didn’t let the water boil because when I turned the heat to high, the stove made a ticking noise and I thought it might explode. So I just poured the box of noodles into the water and heated over low until it boiled. Now those were some dis-gus-ting noodles. I’ve never made that mistake again.

So, if it’s too cold for grilling, or you’re worried you might have a propane explosion, know that you can broil or bake this recipe for chipotle-lime chicken breasts. Just be aware of the thickness of the chicken breasts. If they are small, broiling will work great. If they are large you’ll want to bake them because high heat will char the outsides while leaving the centers undercooked. If you want to grill or broil thick chicken breasts, or bake them faster, consider pounding them to an even thickness before marinading.

Enjoy this fiery chicken as is, or inside an enchilada, taco, or tortilla soup. Or maybe even a chipotle-pepperjack pizza, mmm!

 

Chipotle-Lime Chicken

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • Juice of 2 large limes, divided
  • 2 TBS pureed chipotle peppers with adobo sauce, or 1 minced pepper + 2 tsp sauce
  • 1 ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp honey
  • Additional limes, optional

Instructions

Place chicken breasts in a large Ziploc bag or airtight container. Add the lime juice to the bag, reserving 1 tsp of juice for the chipotle rub. Seal the bag or container and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes or overnight.

Combine the chipotle pepper and sauce, salt, chili powder, coriander, garlic powder, black pepper, honey, and reserved lime juice in a small bowl. Mix thoroughly.

Oil and preheat oven or grill. Remove the chicken breasts from the marinade and use your hands to rub the chipotle mixture into the chicken. Grill or broil until temperature reaches 165*, about 7-14 minutes each size depending on the thickness of the chicken. Let the chicken sit for 10 minutes before cutting. Serve with lime wedges for squeezing over the chicken if desired.

Refrigerate or freeze leftovers for later use.

*Or bake at 375 on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet, uncovered, for 25-40 minutes depending on the thickness of the chicken.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/chipotle-lime-chicken/

 

Linked at: Living Well Spending Less, The Weekend Retreat

easy-chinese-orange-beef

Easy Chinese Orange Beef

I spend a lot of time easy-chinese-orange-beeftrying new recipes. Creating new foods is one way that I bring variety to my life at home with young children. The reality is that day to day life with little kids (although I love taking care of my kiddos) is very repetitive and most household tasks are rather mundane. So, I use cooking as a creative outlet.

Even though I try a wide variety of recipes, it is relatively rare that as a family, we like one well enough to keep in our regular rotation. Easy Chinese Orange Beef is one of those regulars. My husband likes it a lot. (Which seems to be the primary factor in which meals hit the “in” list.) Other factors for qualification are that the recipe must be budget-friendly and fit well with items I regularly stock in the kitchen. Also, overly elaborate foods tend to never hit the table more than once, even if they taste good. Fancy cooking generally isn’t my forte.

The honest truth is, this recipe for Chinese orange beef should be made with a good steak, like flank steak or top sirloin, or whatever steak-experts consider yummy. (I’m not a steak expert.) If steak works in your budget, by all means make this recipe with steak and it will be fantastic! If you are like me, and quality steak would break your little beef-loving bank, then you might consider the way that I make this:

Buy a roast on sale. Try to get a decent, leaner type roast rather than a tough grisly one like chuck roast (or low quality cross-rib, ugh).  I used a bottom round rump roast this time that I bought on sale for 2.99/lb. It’s not the most tender roast out there; sirloin tip or top round would be better options. But it wasn’t bad, either.

semifrozenroast

I cut it in half and froze the other half for later use. When you are ready to use your roast for Easy Chinese Orange Beef, you will want it to be slightly frozen. And you will want a big, serrated knife. This sets you up for success in the next step: slicing the roast very, very thinly across the grain and cutting into bite sized strips. thinslicedroast

Mmm, poor man’s steak! I’ll be honest and tell you that using roast for a recipe like this is probably lends more chewy results than using a good steak. But we still think it’s pretty dang good.

This is what the Asian Chili Garlic sauce that I use for this recipe looks like:

chiligarlicsauce

It adds a little heat, but if you don’t like that, you could easily substitute a milder Asian chili sauce; there are many varieties available. Also, if you are wondering what else you could possibly use dark brown sugar for, try this recipe for Buttermilk Pumpkin Donuts.

When you cook the meat, you want your pan to be truly hot (but not so hot that the oil splatters everywhere). If it isn’t, your beef will boil in its own juices. You want the juices to be instantly seared in for tenderer meat. I often make the mistake of not heating my pan high enough due to a fear of hot oil. Ok, hot things in general, especially fire. Over-crowding the pan also contributes to tough, boiled meat, which is why the recipe directs you to cook the beef in two batches. Since the meat is so thin, this doesn’t take very long.

After you remove the beef from the pan, add the orange sauce and stir until it becomes thick and bubbly. Then return the beef to the pan and stir to coat. The end result is a dish of full, beefy flavor coated with a rich, slightly spicy orange sauce. I like to serve it with hot rice, steamed vegetables and a fresh fruit.

easy-chinese-orange-beef

Easy Chinese Orange Beef

recipe slightly adapted from Our Best Bites

Ingredients

  • 2-3 teaspoons grated orange zest
  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Asian chili-garlic sauce
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 TBS canola oil for pan
  • 1-1/2 pounds steak or oven roast (see above directions if using oven roast), trimmed and sliced thinly across grain and lightly sprinkled with salt and pepper
  • 3-4 green onions, sliced
  • hot cooked rice

Instructions

Whisk together orange zest, orange juice, brown sugar, rice vinegar, soy sauce, chili sauce, ginger, and cornstarch; set aside.

Heat a large skillet to medium-high heat. Add oil when pan is hot and tilt to coat the bottom of the pan. The oil is the right temperature when it sizzles but doesn’t pop out of the pan in all directions.

Add half of the beef to the hot pan. Break up any clumps, then let it cook undisturbed for one minute. Then stir and cook until browned, about 2 minutes. Remove the beef to a bowl and repeat with the remaining beef, adding more oil if needed.

After all of the beef has been cooked and removed from the pan, give the sauce a quick whisk and pour it into the skillet. Cook and stir for about 2-3 minutes, until the sauce is thickened and bubbly. Return the meat to the pan and stir to coat. Garnish with green onions and serve with your favorite rice.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/easy-chinese-orange-beef/


Linked at: Living Well Spending Less, Miz Helen’s Country Cottage

thai-chicken-mango-curry-1

Thai Chicken and Mango Curry

Curries are a staple in my home thai-chicken-and-mango-curry because they are quick, easy, and versatile. Curry is my go-to recipe when I have random vegetables to use up, and I can throw in any type of meat I have on hand. The warm, spicy flavor and creamy sauce dresses up even cheap cuts of meat. Cheap cuts of meat are our way of life right now.

I lived in Japan with my family as a young child. My dad was teaching English there. He had lived there for a couple years when he was single, which is how he knew Japanese. My mom had lived in Thailand. The results of having had both parents live in Asia were that I ate a lot of good Japanese- and Thai-inspired food growing up. We had Japanese and Thai curries on a regular basis.

Now, I make no claims to authenticity with this recipe. I only claim that it tastes really, really good. And that it’s easy to make. I once had a mango curry at a local Thai restaurant. It tasted like the red curry I’d grown up eating, but with the addition of mangoes. So, I figured I might as well try it at home. It was a smart move–the mangoes are really the star in this curry that makes me want to eat more and more. If fresh mangoes aren’t affordable (or desirable, as is generally the case in my neck of the woods) some stores carry bags of frozen diced mango that are less expensive and convenient to use.

In this recipe, I chose to use bell peppers and zucchini, but keep in mind that you can sub in whatever vegetables (and meat) you prefer. You may have to adjust the cooking time to suit the type of vegetables you use, but that’s about it. Make sure to use full-fat coconut milk or your curry will be very watery. A note on the coconut milk: the only difference between a can of “Lite” coconut milk and full fat is that the “Lite” has been watered down. Since it typically costs the same, it is more cost-efficient to simply buy full-fat coconut milk and water it down yourself. Then you have a lot more “light” coconut milk for your dollar.

You might consider this rich and creamy dish for a Halloween dinner–after all, it’s orange and green!

thai-chicken-mango-curry

Thai Chicken and Mango Curry

Ingredients

  • 2 TBS canola oil
  • 3/4 lb chicken breast, diced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 1 medium zucchini, halved lengthwise and sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 TBS minced or grated ginger
  • 1 can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1 TBS red curry paste
  • 1 1/2 TBS brown sugar
  • 1 cup diced mango
  • Hot cooked rice

Instructions

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, then add oil to hot pan. Add the chicken, onions, bell pepper, zucchini, garlic, and ginger. Cook and stir until the chicken is cooked through. Add the coconut milk, chicken broth, curry paste, and brown sugar to the pan and stir to combine. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and add mango, stirring till heated through. Serve with hot cooked rice. Serves 4

*Note: This recipe was formulated using a hot-style curry paste from an Asian market and yields a mild-medium heat curry. If you are using a mild brand of curry paste such as Thai Kitchen, you may wish to add more curry paste.

http://www.raspberriesintherough.com/thai-chicken-and-mango-curry/